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Marcos files poll protest, seeks votes recount

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(Photo from ABS-CBN News)

 

MANILA — Before vowing out, Senator Ferdinand "Bong Bong" Marcos, Jr. personally filed before the Supreme Court (SC), which serves as the Presidential Electoral Tribunal (PET), his election protest against the victory of Vice-President-elect Leni Robredo.

 

In the more than 1,000-page petition, Marcos asked the PET to nullify the proclamation of Robredo and declare him as the duly-elected Vice-President in the May 9, 2016 national elections.

 

Aside from the petition itself, Marcos also submitted before the SC the 20,000-page affidavit, certificates of canvass and other supporting documents, which he said, would clearly prove the massive electoral fraud committed in the history of the country.

 

According to Atty. George Garcia, legal counsel of Marcos, through fraud, anomaly and irregularities, the votes of Robredo increased while the votes of Marcos decreased to make it appear the he only placed second in the elections.

 

The camp of Marcos also asked the PET for the reopening of the ballot boxes in 36,465 clustered precincts being protested, including the Cebu Province, Leyte, Negros Occidental, Negros Oriental, Samar, Isabela, Pangasinan, Cebu City, Zamboanga and Bukidnon, which were considered as bailiwicks of Marcos.

 

Marcos further asked the PET to nullify the election results in Lanao Del Sur, Maguindanao at Basilan, and to have a recount in the 22 provinces and five cities.

 

Marcos argued that their petition is consisting of three parts which detail how the electoral fraud was committed.

 

Firstly, he said, was the irregularity in the Automated Election System (AES); secondly, the traditional means of fraud such as vote-buying, pre-shading and failure of elections; and thirdly, the alteration made by the Smartmatic in the hash code of the transparency server.

 

It can be recalled that Robredo won by more than 260,000 votes against Marcos in the vice-presidential elections.

 

 

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