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Malapascua Island execs press Cebu gov on eco-tourism plan

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CEBU CITY â€• Officials of Barangay Logon, known popularly as Malapascua Island off Daanbantayan town in northern Cebu, have asked Cebu Governor Hilario Davide III to implement the eco-tourism development plan that has been stalled for several years.
 
Barangay Logon Captain Rex Novabos said they want Davide to implement at least the components of the Malapascua Island Eco-Tourism Development Plan (MIEDP).
 
These include the construction of the barangay port or wharf, circumferential road, police headquarters and police outpost in the island, one of the most popular tourist destinations in the province.
 
Novabos said implementation of the MIEDP is “necessary for the development of Malapascua Island into a world class tourist destination.”
 
The Daanbantayan Municipal Council led by Vice Mayor Gilbert Arrabis Jr. endorsed the request of the barangay to the governor.
 
The Logon barangay council also asked the town’s former mayor, Cebu Provincial Board Member Sun Shimura, to donate P140,000 for the purchase of a steel cabinet and for the construction of a community stage in Sitios Guimbitayan, Indonacion and Tawigan.
 
The MIEDP was crafted in 2002 during the term of former Cebu governor Pablo Garcia.
 
The present provincial administration is interested to implement the MIEDP after Capitol officials led by Vice Governor Agnes Magpale who heads the PB committee on tourism visited the island last April.
 
The officials visited Malapascua Island following the death of a Briton, who was shot by a dive shop’s security guard.
Magpale said among the measures that would be implemented is the “tourist police substation,” which is part of MIEDP.
Magpale said that during their visit, only one policeman was assigned in the area and did not have a permanent place to stay in.
 
The issues on a circumferential road and noisy motorcycles were also brought up during the consultation.
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